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Mother of Jeffrey Dahmer Victim Criticizes Hollywood For Monetizing Real-Life Tragedy

Dahmer poster courtesy of MPAA

Mother of Jeffrey Dahmer Victim Criticizes Hollywood For Monetizing Real-Life Tragedy

By Movieguide® Contributor

Evan Peters took home a Golden Globe for his performance as Jeffrey Dahmer, but the actor is facing criticism from the family members of Dahmer’s victims. 

Shirley Hughes is the mother of Tony Hughes, who was murdered by Dahmer in 1991. His death was dramatized in an episode of Netflix’s DAHMER – MONSTER: THE JEFFREY DAHMER STORY.

Hughes spoke about her feelings regarding Peters’ win for portraying Dahmer, saying, “There’s a lot of sick people around the world and people winning acting roles from playing killers keeps the obsession going and this makes sick people thrive on the fame.”

“It’s a shame that people can take our tragedy and make money,” she continued. “The victims never saw a cent. We go through these emotions every day.”

Hughes also said that Peters should have used his acceptance speech to acknowledge the families of the victims and urge Hollywood to stop using real-life tragedies as material for shows and movies. 

Hughes isn’t the only family member of one of Dahmer’s victims to speak out against the show. Movieguide® previously reported:

The family of one of serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer’s victim’s says the new Netflix show is profiting off their pain and is re-traumatizing those who lived through it.

“It’s sad that they’re just making money off of this tragedy. That’s just greed,” says Rita Isbell, sister of Erroll Lindsey. “The episode with me was the only part I saw. I didn’t watch the whole show. I don’t need to watch it. I lived it. I know exactly what happened.”

DAHMER – MONSTER: THE JEFFREY DAHMER STORY dropped on Netflix earlier this month, and stars Evan Peters in a hyperviolent, hyper grotesque retelling from the hands of AMERICAN HORROR STORY Producer Ryan Murphy.

Murphy is known for taking significant liberties in his productions, using shock to entice viewers.

For the families of Dahmer’s victims, this is unacceptable.

“I’m not telling anyone what to watch, I know true crime media is huge rn, but if you’re actually curious about the victims, my family (the Isbell’s) are pissed about this show,” says Eric Perry, who identifies himself as Lindsey’s cousin. “It’s retraumatizing over and over again, and for what? How many movies/shows/documentaries do we need?” …

DAHMER is a pathetic reflection of society’s insatiable appetite for pursuing darker entertainment. When left unchecked, studios will delve into painful, exploitive, hyper violence.