MONKEY TROUBLE Add To My Top 10

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Release Date: March 18, 1994

Starring: Harvey Keitel, Thora Birch, Mimi Rogers, & Christopher McDonald

Genre: Comedy

Audience: All ages

Rating: PG

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Amurri & Stu Krieger

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Content:

(B, A/D, V) Uplifting, positive comedy that emphasizes family love & portrays stealing as wrong; no obscenities, 1 exclamatory profanity & 1 crude epithet; several scenes with gypsy drinking whiskey; moderate violence in rough treatment of gypsy, girl, boy, & monkey; and, monkey shoots gun at man & trailer damaged.

Summary:

The comedy MONKEY TROUBLE is about a pet capuchin monkey whose owner has taught him to steal, but who later decides to leave and to live with 9 year-old Eva. Eva's parents don't know about her new pet, and the monkey's owner tries to get him back. MONKEY TROUBLE is an uniquely clever, entertaining film that is refreshingly free of offensive elements. It will delight the entire family.

Review:

In MONKEY TROUBLE, a small pet capuchin monkey steals the show. He is a laugh a minute as he chatters, grins and races around doing his assigned tasks for Azor (Harvey Keitel), a gypsy organ grinder and con artist. The capuchin delights the bystanders as he hops around on them, but at the same time, secretly relieves them of their jewelry and loose cash. He's so good that two professional gangsters want him to work for them. However, the monkey decides to leave and takes up with 9 year-old Eva (Thora Birch) who names him Dodger. Eva is thrilled to have a pet but neglects telling her parents who would object. In the meantime, the gangsters try to recover the monkey. The action and the fun never slow down as Eva tries to keep her parents from discovering Dodger and to elude the gangsters who are hot on her trail.

MONKEY TROUBLE is an uniquely clever, entertaining film which will not only delight children, but mom and dad as well. What a joy to find this film is virtually free of offensive elements! Although preoccupied with Eva's young brother, Eva's parents love her and are attentive to her needs and feelings. When Eva grows weary of deceiving her parents, she consults her teacher who says that telling the truth is a good way to make things better. With considerable difficulty, Eva teaches Dodger not to steal. The film provides fun entertainment with positive messages.

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