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WOMEN TALKING

What You Need To Know:

WOMEN TALKING is a unique drama set in 2010 WOMEN TALKING is a unique drama set in 2010 in an isolated Mennonite community somewhere in America. Based on a true story from Bolivia, the women in the community learn that a few of the menfolk secretly have been raping some of the women after incapacitating them with animal tranquilizer. Before that discovery, the elders had tried to convince the women they’ve been attacked by demons. The women are equally divided on whether to stay and fight or to leave. So, they appoint three families of women to decide between the two choices.

WOMEN TALKING starts slowly and seems to go in a pretentious direction. However, as the women debate their two options, their conflicts become more interesting. Eventually, it all leads to a nice, emotional climax peppered with strong, somewhat inspiring biblical statements of faith, including references to Jesus. However, WOMEN TALKING also has some statements of false theology, including feminism, a false interpretation of Philippians 4:8 and woke transgender content about a traumatized rape victim who now identifies as a man.

Content:

(PaPaPa, CC, BB, FRFR, Ro, FeFe, HoHo, L, VV, S, AA, DD, M):

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Very strong mixed worldview with strong Christian, biblical references by the female cast to Jesus, faith and biblical passages such as Philippians 4:8 but mixed with false theology and ideology such as one older woman falsely concludes that the Philippians passage’s message is “pacifism,” brief Romantic dialogue suggests that people are basically good, one or two women express some feminist conclusions about men and society on incidents where a group of men in their community drugged some of the women with animal tranquilizers to rape them (plus one of the women, when asked by the male schoolteacher to marry him, says no because she’s afraid she’ll lose her “identity” in a marriage, which sounds like a false radical feminist notion) and, in a transgender subplot about one of the raped women, a young woman “switched” her sex to a man and asked to be called Melvin, and the other women in the community finally accept her mental delusion

Foul Language:
Two “f” obscenities (one old-fashioned woman says an “f” phrase improperly and another woman corrects her on how to say it), one BS obscenity, one “s” obscenity, and no profanities

Violence:
Flashback shows raped women smearing blood on wall after suffering a miscarriage, discussion of being raped and contemplating murder, a woman with a scythe is restrained when she tries to attack one of several men who have tranquilized the women in her community and raped them, and woman and her daughter have bruises and cuts on their faces after husband unexpectedly returns home and beats them after becoming drunk

Sex:
Discussion by Mennonite women of being secretly drugged and raped by a group of men in their community and movie has a transgender sublot about one of the younger women in the community “changing” her sex

Nudity:
No nudity

Alcohol Use:
No depicted alcohol use, but a woman and her daughter are beaten off screen after the woman’s husband unexpectedly returns home and allegedly becomes drunk

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
Brief smoking and references to incidents where women were drugged before being raped; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Some brief talk against forgiveness.

More Detail:

WOMEN TALKING is a unique drama set in 2010 about a small group of women in an isolated Mennonite community somewhere in America who’ve been chosen to decide whether all the women should do nothing, stay and fight, or leave the community after it’s discovered that a few of the menfolk secretly have been raping some of the women after incapacitating them with animal tranquilizer. Based on a true story from Bolivia, the second half of WOMEN TALKING builds to a nice climax peppered with strong, rather inspiring biblical statements of faith, but those statements also include some false theology, and the movie contains mature subject matter, brief images of violence, three obscenities, a promotion of transgender delusions, and references to Romantic, feminist ideas.

The movie opens with a brief narration about the abuse the women suffered. The male elders tried to convince the women that they suffered some demonic attack, but one night one of the younger teenage girls caught one of the men fleeing from one woman’s house. The local sheriff arrested him, and he identified several of his partners in crime. They were arrested too, but the men decided to go to town to post bail for them.

The women take a vote on whether to do nothing, stay and fight, or leave their Mennonite community. However, there’s a tie between staying and fighting versus leaving. So, the women choose a small executive committee of three families to discuss the issue for 24 hours and break the tie. Since none of the women can read or write, they pick the community’s young male schoolteacher, August, to take minutes of the discussion.

WOMEN TALKING starts off slowly and seems to go in a pretentious direction. However, as the women debate the two option in front of them, their conflicts become more interesting. Eventually, it all leads to a nice, emotional climax peppered with strong, somewhat inspiring biblical statements of faith, including references to forgiveness and the salvation Jesus brings. For example, one of the women in favor of leaving says she’s not giving up her Christian faith just because of actions of a few men and just because the elders seem to have decided not to banish the evil men until the authorities convict them of their crimes. Also, at one point toward the end, one of the older women quotes Philippians 4:8, which says, “Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable – if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.”

However, the positive Christian, biblical dialogue in WOMEN TALKING is mixed with some false theology and false biblical interpretations. For example, the woman who quotes Philippians also tells the women she thinks the message of that passage is “pacificism.” This conclusion is a real stretch.

In addition, the women in WOMEN TALKING sometimes express false feminist statements. For example, in deciding whether to stay, one or two of the women, express the feminist position that the male elders in their church are part of a system that sees women as send-class citizens. Thus, if the women decide to do nothing or stay and fight, they would be up against a system that teaches young boys and men to think of women as inferior. This, of course, is simplistic nonsense about the power of the “patriarchy.” In another scene, the schoolteacher, August, expresses his love to one of the articulate young women, Ona, who’s become pregnant from being raped by one of the men who drugged the women. He offers to marry Ona and help her take care of the baby, but Ona declines. She says she’s afraid that she would lose her personal “identity” in a marriage. This is another radical feminist idea that fails to understand the biblical concept of marriage and family. For example, the God of the Bible may give different roles to men and women, but He also orders commands people in the Ten Commandments to “honor your father and mother,” a command that implies at last some level of equality between men and women in the family and beyond.

Finally, one of the young women in the community who was raped and suffered a miscarriage decided to call herself a man and cut off her long female hair. She’s helping to take care of the children while the committee debates what to do. At the end of the movie, the women in the committee accept the woman’s phony sex change and start calling her by her chosen, male name, Melvin.

Thus, despite its positive references to Christian faith, forgiveness and specific biblical passages, WOMEN TALKING also includes some false theology and woke transgender content. WOMEN TALKING also contains mature subject matter, brief images of violence and three obscenities. It’s the movie’s false theology, feminism and woke transgender content, though, that makes WOMEN TALKING excessive and unacceptable.