YA VEREMOS

"A Son Tries To Reunite His Divorced Parents"

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Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

Summary:

In the Mexican movie YA VEREMOS, an 11-year-old boy makes a list of all the things he wants to do with his divorced parents after he learns he has a rare condition that could lead to blindness within the month. YA VEREMOS is a heartfelt family movie with an excellent script that extols marriage against divorce, but it has some light sexual references, brief but strong foul language, and a couple poor parental decisions. So, caution is advised for older children.

Review:

YA VEREMOS, meaning “we shall see” in Spanish, is a Mexican movie about a young boy desperate to reunite his recently divorced parents. After Santi learns he has a rare eye condition that could lead to blindness, he sees his condition as the perfect opportunity to bring his divorced parents together.

Santi makes a list of all the things he wants to see in case he goes blind while his father sets up an appointment for emergency eye surgery. The father is plagued with worry when he learns the surgery has a 50% success rate, but it’s the only option. Santi gives his father the list of things he wants to do over the next two weeks in case he goes blind. His dad, a workaholic doctor, groans when he sees the long list. When Santi informs his father he wants to do everything with his mother as well, the father complains. Santi reminds him he may never see again, and his father decides to carry out his son’s wishes.

The father calls up his ex-wife who is on her way to a magical vacation with her mega-wealthy fiancé, but she won’t answer the phone. He hops in his car and races to the airport to stop her from leaving. He arrives at the airport right before she leaves. When she learns her son may go blind, she breaks down and explains to her fiancée how vital it is she is there for her son. He understands, and she cancels her vacation with him. Santi’s mom moves back into her former home, at the request of her son, while she loads him up with hearty meals and carrot juice to help his failing eyes. Then, the adventure begins.

Over the next two weeks, the trio carry out Santi’s list of things to do. They go to a wrestling match, teach him how to drive, set up a plan for him to see a naked woman, and travel to their son’s desired destination — the place where his mom and dad had their honeymoon. There are believable heartfelt moments like when his parents teach their son to drive. Then, there are absurd, outlandish moments like when his father gets revenge on an ex-girlfriend so his son can see a naked lady.

When his parents travel to Santi’s dream vacation (their honeymoon spot), his mother and father remember how much they love one another. They kiss and give Santi hope they may get back together. However, when Santi brings this up, they explain to him it was wrong they kissed because they’re divorced now. Their explanation makes it very confusing for Santi to know where his parent’s relationship stands, and yet it gives a realistic depiction of how confusing divorce can be.

Will Santi’s parents get back together? Will Santi’s operation be successful?

YA VEREMOS is a touching dramatic comedy with a few wonderful laugh-out-loud moments and deeply touching sentimental scenes surely to bring tears to the viewer’s eyes. It has a strong moral worldview with redemptive elements extolling compassion, sacrifice, and love. However, YA VEREMOS also contains some light sexual references, brief but strong gratuitous foul language, a couple poor parental decisions, and instances of greed, revenge, and lying. So, caution is advised for older children.

Content:

(BB, C, L, V, S, AA, MM):

Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Strong moral worldview with implied Christian, redemptive elements depicts great compassion, sacrifice, and love by two parents for their child who may lose his eyesight, son honors his father and mother although he doesn’t agree with all their decisions, divorced parents come together for the sake of their child, parents display implied Christian faith and values when they lay hands and bow their head over their son in the hospital (thus implying an act of prayer), movie shows how important the role of a mother and father are in a child’s life, movie implies how vital it is to have a mother and a father, echoing back all the way to Genesis when God said man and woman become one;

Foul Language:
One “f” obscenity and one GD profanity;

Violence:
Some wrestling violence, car just misses another car, woman kicks and hits man, and a crazy young woman the divorced father slept with one drunken evening goes berserk when she runs into his ex-wife and son in the house (the audience doesn’t see the action, but are shown a visual of all the furniture and books thrown across the living room from her wrath);

Sex:
Implied sexual promiscuity and immorality when father references his shame and regret from having a one-night stand with a woman after drinking too much tequila, father kisses and makes out with a woman out of revenge not love, and mom and dad agree to let their son (who may lose his eyesight) see a naked woman at his request (although the naked woman is never shown, this is a poor immoral sexual decision made by the parents);

Nudity:
No depicted nudity, but visual of a woman’s bare shoulders in the shower implies she’s nude;

Alcohol Use:
Light alcohol use, mom and dad drink a beer on vacation, mom drinks a glass of champagne with her fiancée, and dad makes reference to drinking too much tequila, which resulted in his sleeping with a woman one evening;

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
No smoking or drug use; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Miscellaneous immorality includes bad role models, lying, divorce, and revenge.

In Brief:

YA VEREMOS (meaning “we shall see” in Spanish) is a Mexican movie about a young boy desperate to reunite his recently divorced parents. Santi, 11-years-old, has developed a rare eye condition that could lead to blindness. He makes a list of everything he wants to do in case he never sees again. However, he wants to do them with both of his divorced parents. His mother, engaged to one of the richest men in Mexico, and his father, a workaholic doctor, come together for their son’s benefit.

YA VEREMOS is entertaining but sometimes fails to measure up to its potential. The problem partly arises in the list of things Santi wants to do. Some of his requests are believable (like seeing a wrestling match), but others seem a bit bizarre, like his request to see a naked woman. More absurd is that his parents agree to this. There are also a couple unnecessary strong obscenities and profanities. YA VEREMOS has a solid moral worldview with some implied Christian, redemptive elements and several heartfelt, tearful moments. However, caution is advised for older children.