THE HUNTING PARTY

Content:

(PaPa, B, PCPC, APAP, LLL, VVV, S, NN, AA, D, MM) Strong mixed pagan worldview with light moral elements about bringing a war criminal to justice, but the movie is rather one-sided toward Muslims in the Bosnian-Serbian conflict in the 1990s and somewhat politically correct and indicates the American CIA is guilty of deliberately conspiring to let some important war criminals roam free; 136 mostly strong obscenities, 11 strong profanities and seven light profanities; very strong violence with some blood includes war violence, people beaten up and shot-up body of pregnant woman shown; implied fornication and pregnancy out of wedlock; brief upper female nudity, and brief upper and rear male nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking; and, lying, negative view of authority, revenge, vigilante justice, and a gratuitous slam against the Bush administration during the end credits.

Summary:

THE HUNTING PARTY is a satirical political thriller about three journalists looking to interview an indicted Serbian war criminal five years after the war in Bosnia between Muslim and Serbian nationalists. THE HUNTING PARTY is a foul-mouthed, one-dimensional portrait of this region that fails to tell the Serbian side of the story.

Review:

THE HUNTING PARTY is a fictionalized, sometimes satirical account of a true story about some American journalists searching for a Serbian war criminal in Bosnia and Herzegovina along the Serbian and Montenegro border.
The movie opens during the conflict outside Sarajevo between Muslim and Serbian nationalists in the late 1990s. After a Serbian leader and his men murder his pregnant Muslim lover, TV journalist Simon Hunt, played by Richard Gere, has an on-air meltdown against the Serbs that gets him fired and ostracized.
Five years later, Hunt’s cameramen, Duck, played by Terrence Howard, now ensconced in a cushy network job, re-visits Sarajevo. Simon suddenly shows up. He promises Duck the story of a lifetime: an interview with the Serbian war criminal responsible for his woman’s death who’s escaped punishment after all these years. Accompanied by a young journalist intern, they embark on a dangerous quest in Serbian communities in the mountainous border next to Serbia and Montenegro. It’s the scoop of a lifetime, but will they live to report it?
THE HUNTING PARTY is an uneven, one-dimensional, foul-mouthed portrait of this region that fails to note the vast support from Islamic terrorists, including Al-Qaeda, that the Muslims there have been getting since the early 1990s. Hollywood and the news media would rather focus on real and imagined atrocities committed by those fighting the Islamic jihad against the West in the Balkans and elsewhere. That said, engaging in outright war against these Muslims, as the Serbian leaders did in the 1990s, is not always the prudent or moral course, even if no war-crime atrocities occur.

In Brief:

THE HUNTING PARTY, a satirical political thriller, opens during the conflict outside Sarajevo between Muslim and Serbian nationalists in the late 1990s. After a Serbian leader and his men murder his pregnant Muslim lover, TV journalist Simon Hunt, played by Richard Gere, has an on-air meltdown that gets him fired. Five years later, Hunt’s cameramen, Duck, played by Terrence Howard, ensconced in a cushy network job, re-visits Sarajevo. Simon shows up. He promises Duck an interview with the Serbian war criminal responsible for his woman’s death, who’s escaped punishment after all these years. It’s the scoop of a lifetime, but will they live to report it? THE HUNTING PARTY is an uneven, one-dimensional, foul-mouthed portrait of this region that fails to note the vast support from Islamic terrorists, including Al-Qaeda, that the Muslims there have been getting since the early 1990s. Some in Hollywood would rather focus on real and imagined atrocities committed by those fighting the Islamic jihad against the West. That said, engaging in outright war against these Muslims, as the Serbian leaders did in the 1990s, is not always the prudent or moral course, even if no war-crime atrocities occur.