THE JONESES

You Can’t Keep Up with Them

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 16, 2010

Starring: David Duchovny, Demi Moore,
Amber Heard, Ben
Hollingsworth, Gary Cole,
Glenne Headly, and Lauren
Hutton

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Roadside Attractions

Director: Derrick Borte

Executive Producer: Sheetal Talwar, Tom Luse, Paul
Young, and Peter Principato

Producer: Doug Mankoff, Andrew
Spaulding, Derrick Borte, and
Kristi Zea

Writer: Derrick Borte

Address Comments To:

Howard Cohen and Eric d’Arbeloff
Co-President
Roadside Attractions
421 South Beverly Drive, 8th Floor
Beverly Hills, CA 90212
Phone: (310) 789-4710
Fax: (310) 789-4711
Website: www.roadsideattractions.com
Email: dustins@roadsideattractions.com

Content:

(BB, PaPa, HoHo, LL, V, SS, NN, AA, DD, M) Ultimately strong moral worldview as protagonist finally quits an unethical job but mixed with strong pagan and homosexual elements; 17 obscenities and three profanities; man commits suicide by drowning; teenage boy attempts to kiss another teenage boy, implied sex between older man and underage teenage girl, implied sex between unmarried couple, and adultery; teenage girl in short shorts and scene of girl’s locker room with teenage girls in various stages of undress, upper female nudity, upper male nudity; teenage drinking and drunkenness; teenagers smoke marijuana; and, lying.

Summary:

THE JONESES is a raunchy comedy about a seemingly perfect family that moves into a gated community – but they are not really a family, but rather are working for a stealth marketing company. With strong pagan elements, including strong sexual content and homosexual elements, THE JONESES is not really an acceptable comedy for media-wise viewers.

Review:

THE JONESES is a raunchy comedy about a seemingly perfect family that moves into a gated community; but, they are not what they seem.

Steve and Kate are very rich. Steve spends his days at the country club playing golf and Kate visits spas and goes shopping. Teenager Jenn has all the clothes the other girls want, and teenager Mick has all the electronic games and gadgets all the other boys want. The only thing is, they are not a family. They are co-workers posing as a family for a stealth marketing company. They make everyone in their circle of influence want the things they own to increase sales for various products.

Mastermind “handler” KC tracks the fake family’s scores and encourages Steve, who is new to this job, to increase his influence and subsequently increase product sales.

Pretending to be husband and wife, Steve and Kate eventually become romantically involved. Jenn begins having an affair with a married man from the community. Mick turns out to have homosexual lusts and attempts to kiss a fellow student but is rebuffed.

Steve befriends Larry, a neighbor, and is able to convince him and others to buy the same car, golf clubs, cigars, and the like. Larry, though, cannot keep up and ultimately commits suicide because he’s so far in debt.

Larry’s death serves as a wake up call for Steve, who realizes that he is living a lie and in some way contributed to Larry’s death. He admits to the neighbors what’s happening and is fired. Kate and the others flee from the house and get reassigned to a new city with a new “husband/father.” Steve is able to find them and pleads with Kate to leave the pretend life and go with him.

THE JONESES is a very clever and unique concept. There is fun in watching the pretend family try to influence everyone around them to buy the things that they own. The story, though, doesn’t hold up, and, by the end, the unique concept is wearing thin.

There is also a very large story hole and that is how KC the handler actually tracks sales so she can announce that Steve has influenced 4% or 15%. Their strategy is a “ripple effect” – they tell someone who tells someone else. But, how exactly is that quantified?

The characters are a bit flat, and only toward the end do viewers get to know Steve and Kate at all.

THE JONESES has strong sexual immorality in it. The “teenage daughter” is having an affair with a married man who is a friend of her “parents.” The “teenage son” has homosexual lusts and attempts to kiss a fellow male student. Also, Steve and Kate aren’t really married but they begin to sleep together.

These strong pagan, homosexual elements, some nudity, brief foul language, and other troubling elements are excessive and turn THE JONESES into an unacceptable viewing experience.

In Brief:

THE JONESES is about a seemingly perfect family that is actually a group of co-workers posing as a family for a stealth marketing company. They make everyone in their circle of influence want the things they own to increase sales for various products. Pretending to be husband and wife, Steve and Kate eventually become romantically involved. Teenager Jenn has an affair with a married neighbor. Teenager Mick turns out to be homosexually inclined. Steve befriends Larry, a neighbor, and convinces him to buy the same things he owns. Larry, though, cannot keep up and ultimately commits suicide because he’s so far in debt, causing Steve to quit his job.

THE JONESES is a very clever and unique concept. There is fun watching the pretend family try to influence everyone around them to buy the things that they own. The story, though, doesn’t hold up. The characters are a bit flat. Only towards the end do viewers get to know Steve and Kate at all. With strong pagan, homosexual elements diluting the movie positive ending, including some foul language and strong sexual immorality, THE JONESES is not really an acceptable comedy for media-wise viewers.