MAGGIE

"Two Large Moral Ambiguities Mar Poignant Movie"

Quality:
Content: -3 Excessive content and/or worldview problems.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

MAGGIE stars Arnold Schwarzenegger as Wade Vogel, a father searching for his 16-year-old daughter, Maggie. Played by Abigail Breslin, Maggie ran away after being diagnosed with a zombie virus infecting the human race. The movie opens with the authorities finding Maggie, and Wade bringing Maggie home to the family farm, where Wade lives with Maggie’s stepmother, Caroline, and Maggie’s stepbrother and stepsister. The two younger siblings are taken to their aunt while Wade and Caroline take care of Maggie, but soon, Caroline leaves. This leaves Wade alone with Maggie to watch helplessly as his beloved daughter succumbs to the virus.

MAGGIE is a very poignant, extremely well made movie. Schwarzenegger and Abigail Breslin bring a depth to their roles as the caring father and afflicted daughter that hasn’t been seen from them before. MAGGIE is fairly free of offensive content. There’s not much foul language, and the violence and makeup are subdued, especially for a zombie movie. However, the second half has three brief scenes suggesting suicide is viable solutions for Maggie and her father. Ultimately, therefore, MAGGIE is morally and theologically unacceptable.

Content:

(PaPa, BB, C, FRFR, LL, VV, M) Strong mixed pagan worldview with strong moral elements when story focuses on the caring between a father and a daughter, with some brief Christian elements, but marred by one brief scene promoting euthanasia and two brief scenes promoting suicide and indicating someone can go to Heaven after committing suicide, perhaps because the suicide is an attempt to protect others (movie purposely vague/ambiguous); eight obscenities, one GD, and one OMG; brief strong violence includes two zombies shot, girl cuts off her infected finger, zombie virus discolors people’s skin and turns them grotesque, man threatens sheriff to leave his daughter alone, male teenager infected with zombie virus is taken away, implied suicide; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, one doctor tells man he should kill his daughter rather than take her to facility with other people infected by zombie virus.

More Detail:

MAGGIE is a unique drama starring Arnold Schwarzenegger as a father trying to care for his daughter who’s been infected with a zombie virus affecting the human race. MAGGIE is very well produced, with excellent performances, but there are a few scenes suggesting support for euthanasia and suicide in the second half, so the movie ultimately is morally and theologically unacceptable. If they cut those scenes or changed their meaning, MAGGIE could be an award-winning movie, because it’s surprisingly free of offensive content otherwise.

Arnold plays Wade Vogel, a father who’s been searching for his 16-year-old daughter, Maggie. Played by Abigail Breslin, Maggie ran away after being diagnosed with the zombie disease. The movie opens with the authorities finding Maggie, and Wade bringing Maggie home to the family farm, where Wade lives with Maggie’s stepmother, Caroline, and her stepbrother and stepsister.

The two younger siblings are taken to their aunt while Wade and Caroline take care of Maggie, but soon, even Caroline has to leave. This leaves Wade alone with Maggie to watch helplessly as the disease slowly progresses.

Some people tell Wade to send Maggie to the containment facility where they treat the zombified people with a painful treatment that makes them more malleable as their consciousness slowly erodes. Others tell him he must kill Maggie when the time comes. Wade rejects both solutions, hoping for some kind of miracle cure, but Maggie is clearly deteriorating every day, little by little.

MAGGIE the movie is a very poignant, extremely well made movie. Schwarzenegger and Abigail Breslin bring a depth to their roles as the caring father and afflicted daughter that hasn’t been seen from them before. MAGGIE is clearly one of Arnold’s best performances. The movie never mentions the word zombie, so the disease in the story could almost be like any other very contagious terminal disease.

MAGGIE is fairly free of offensive content. There’s not much foul language, and the violence and makeup are rather subdued, especially for a zombie movie. So, the main problem with MAGGIE is that there are three brief scenes suggesting that the main characters, and the filmmakers, eventually accept the ideas that euthanasia and suicide are viable solutions to the moral dilemma Maggie and her father face in the story.

Therefore, despite how good the movie and acting are, and how poignant many of the scenes are, MOVIEGUIDE® ultimately finds MAGGIE unacceptable. In fact, the ending to this movie may be one of the biggest disappointments in recent years.

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